Nothing But The Truth, Episode 2

Do you tell little lies to yourself and others from time to time?

Have you convinced yourself that it’s not a big deal?

In this video, I expose that behavior as addictive and what to do about it.

Check out my new offerings:

Interviewing Skills Online Course titled “I Got The Job!” 

My new book (on Amazon) on Interviewing titled “I Got The Job!”

Leadership Online Course: Performance Enhancing Feedback

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Nothing But The Truth, Episode 1

Have you ever lied to yourself, and possibly others, about a situation in your life?

Has the lying ever interfered with your strivings for success?

In this video, I share a lie I used to tell, why I did so and why I stopped.

Check out my new Interviewing Skills Online Course titled “I Got The Job!” Use the coupon code NEWJOB25 before 4.30.2021 to receive your 25% discount.

Check out my new book (on Amazon) on Interviewing titled “I Got The Job!”

Also discounted is my new Leadership Online Course: Performance Enhancing Feedback. Use the coupon code FEEDBACK25 before 4.30.2021 to receive your 25% discount.

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Are You A Blimp Worthy Leader?

Do you consider yourself a GREAT leader?

Are you good enough that the Goodyear Blimp would show up to cover your leadership?

In this video, I challenge leaders to work hard to become the best they’re capable of.

Check out my new book (on Amazon) on Interviewing titled “I Got The Job!” http://www.amazon.com/dp/B08FQMVPZS

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Have You Ever Said “NO” To Your Manager?

Have you ever said “NO” to your manager?

Have you been tempted to but feared doing so?

In this video, I respond to a viewer’s question and share situations when I encourage you to say no.

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4 Ways To Customize Performance Feedback

In my last two posts, How To GET Useful Performance Feedback and 4 More Ways To GET Useful Performance Feedback I shared tips to improve the feedback you request on your performance.

Now it’s time to focus on customizing performance feedback you GIVE to others to increase its effectiveness and position you to be seen as more respectful to employees.

In this video, I’ll share 4 ways to customize your feedback based on what you know about a particular employee.

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4 More Ways To GET Useful Performance Feedback

In my last post, How To GET Useful Performance Feedback, I shared my first tip on how to get useful performance feedback.

In this video, I’ll share four more tips on how and when to ask for performance feedback to get employees to be more honest and give you more useful feedback.

Utilize some of these methods and watch the quality of the feedback given to you increase!

In my next post, I’ll share a tip on customizing feedback that will increase its effectiveness and help you be seen as more respectful to employees.

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How To GET Useful Performance Feedback

When you ASK for performance feedback the right way you increase your chances of getting honest, helpful feedback.

The wrong approach typically results in no feedback, nothing helpful, or dishonest answers.

In this video, I show you the first of five effective approaches.

In my next post, I’ll share four more.

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How To Value Everyone’s Voice

Have you ever attended a team meeting and little was accomplished? Maybe some people even left with hard feelings?

We all probably have, and what that experience exposed was most likely poor leadership of the meeting.

Multi-generational teams challenge leaders more than ever before because of their diverse perspectives and work styles.

In this week’s video, I share how to manage the dismissiveness that can occur on multi-generational teams.

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How To Lead Without Having The Authority

As a panel member at the 2019 Georgia Environmental Conference, I was asked, “How is leadership accomplished when you do not have real authority?”

I discuss the leaders I’ve met who have a leadership title but have no clue about leadership.

I also brag about the untitled leaders who display superb leadership qualities – what I call Blimp Worthy Leadership!

Click the thumbnail below to view the video.

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How To Lead The Next Gens Gifts And Gaps

As a panel member at the 2019 Georgia Environmental Conference, I was asked the question, “How do you lead the next generation of hopefuls?”

Having recently updated my presentation on Generational similarities and differences titled Leadership For A Changing Workforce, I was excited to share my answer.

In my next post, I’ll answer the question, “How is leadership accomplished when you do not have real authority?”

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How Leaders Can Learn From Sports Coaches

As a panel member at the 2019 Georgia Environmental Conference, I was asked the question, “Where do you think you have gained the most guidance in your leadership style?”

I share how I believe business leaders can learn a thing or two from sports, and what I learned in sports that guides my leadership!

In my next post, I’ll answer the question, “How do you lead the next generation of hopefuls?”

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Have You The Courage To Lead With Integrity?

I was recently asked by David Mook of the Centergy Group to participate in a panel discussion on Leadership at the 2019 Georgia Environmental Conference.

We were asked 4 questions – the first of which was, “What is the most basic tenet of leadership in today’s world?”

I share my answer to that question in this video and my answers to the additional three in my next three posts.

My answer to the first question may just challenge you!

In my next post, I answer the question, “Where do you think you have gained the most guidance in your leadership style?”

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The Secret To Keeping Conversations On Track

What the heck happened? I don’t understand! You gotta be kidding me! I didn’t expect that to happen! That’s not the way that was supposed to turn out!

Have you ever felt that way after a conversation?

If you’ve ever gotten into a conversation expecting it to go well only to have it spin out of control and end badly, you will be interested in learning about the feedback loop.

Understanding and utilizing the feedback loop will help keep your conversations on track.

In the accompanying video, I explain this visual communication tool, and how doing the right things keeps a conversation on track, and doing the wrong things derails it. Keys points shown are

  • identify your purpose before beginning
  • action needs to match intention
  • understand how others affect you
  • act rather than react

We also need to address those conversations you expect to be difficult. Do you hesitate to have them or avoid them, even when it’s your responsibility to do so? Hotly contested conversations can pleasantly surprise you. Learn how

  • warm, comfortable conversations can result in not accomplishing your goal
  • challenging conversations can be very productive

One aspect of becoming an effective communicator is controlling your part of the conversation. It requires you follow key communication principles and avoid those tempting, reactive, self-defeating responses.

Learn these principles and watch your conversations improve to the point where you welcome all conversations, knowing you can hold your own, stay fixed on your purpose, and communicate effectively.

That’s my perspective; what’s yours? Leave us a comment or a question below this post, and don’t miss the video on this topic on YouTube!

P.S. In Three Weeks: The Most Powerful Message I Ever Heard read more

How Playing The Blame Game Hinders Success

I delivered a speech a while ago titled Ain’t My Fault. I felt compelled to do it after reading countless articles on the disturbing trend of people blaming others for their mistakes.

What’s worse is that this victimhood trend extends to people blaming everyone and everything for the state of their life. It’s easy to take credit for success; mistakes not so much.

Conventional explanations for this trend are

  • The middle class is struggling to make ends meet and wants a quick payout.
  • Being civil to each other is on the decrease. We are becoming more self-absorbed and find it easier to take advantage of each other.
  • It’s easy to get away with things – things we know are wrong.

Regardless the actual origin(s), the effects are varied, profound and disheartening. I long for a time when every person looks in the mirror and says to themselves

  • This is who I am, what I stand for and believe in
  • I stand for integrity, honesty, and truthfulness
  • My actions reflect those values, and I’m proud of who I’ve become
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    How and When To Mediate A Disagreement

    In the post “How To Stop Passive-Aggressive Behavior In The Workplace” I shared how important it is and how to create a culture where teammates first attempt to resolve differences with each other before requesting leadership assistance.

    The most productive teams involve the supervisor only as a last resort after teammates were unable to resolve their differences themselves.

    If you inherited a team with a different culture, read the post above, change what is expected of teammates to resolve differences, and then prepare yourself to mediate, should it come to that.

    Mediation is appropriate when

    • teammates unsuccessfully attempted to resolve differences
    • one person has a dominant personality, and the other has a passive personality
    • other teammates are getting involved and taking sides
    • a policy was violated

    The first key to a successful mediation is to meet with each party separately before meeting together. Ask each participant the same questions to get both sides of the story and clarify your understanding of the problem and the barriers to resolving it.

    After meeting with each employee, prepare mentally by considering

  • what you believe is the issue
  • their personalities and how each attempts to control conversations
  • any history between them, or similar issue and a different teammate
  • your ideas on how to resolve the issue
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    Helping Top Performers Improve – Part Two: Customizing The Feedback

    In Part One of Helping Top Performers Improve I shared how to move past your hesitation and fear to deliver this feedback. If you struggle with this and haven’t read Part One, please read it and watch the accompanying video before reading this post, as Part Two begins where Part One ends.

    Leaders are taught to treat everyone fairly, but that does not mean you treat everyone the same. Not treating people the same is especially true when it comes to feedback, as customization is the key.

    The profile of Top Performers provides an instructive guide to effectively customizing feedback to them.

     Top Performer Profile

    • have high integrity and are trustworthy
    • take a lot of initiative
    • make decisions based on facts
    • are good at managing their performance and always look for ways to improve
    • have high expectations and are tough on themselves when they make a mistake
    • are mild to highly sensitive to feedback

    Level One Customization – based on the profile

    1. stick to the facts
    2. give objective data first, followed by subjective data and observations
    3. use an approach that eliminates or minimizes their potential embarrassment or disappointment in themselves, while they are in front of you
    4. realize they don’t need much involvement from you past the point of delivery

    While points 1 and 2 apply to most people, points 3 and 4 are unique to Top Performers. They, by their performance, have earned the right to be given more freedom.

    They are not equal, however, in how independently they can operate, thus creating a second level of customization. Include the following points in your second level of customization.

     Level Two Customization – based on the individual and the message

    1. Do they prefer to process feedback entirely on their own, or discuss it with you?
    2. Does the complexity of the message necessitate a discussion or clarification?
    3. If discussion if preferred or required, should it be immediate, or delayed?
    4. Do you desire they take action, or need them to take action on this message?
    5. Do they typically take action on ideas they find valuable, or need that directive?
    6. If direction is preferred or required, what type and how much?

    A common mistake is to involve yourself too much or provide too much direction. A Top Performer’s resistance is a clear signal to give them more space to perform on their own.

    Always start with the least intrusive approach. It’s easier to get more involved than it is to back off after you have over-involved yourself.

    Ask yourself this question: “What is the least intrusive approach I can use while still confident they meet the objective of delivering this message?”

    Delivery Approaches – used almost exclusively with top performers

  • drop-off message – you get together, deliver the message and part ways – with minimal or no discussion
  • a drop-off message with a scheduled, reasonably comprehensive follow-up discussion
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    Helping Top Performers Improve – Part One: Overcoming Reluctance

    Are you reluctant, hesitant or fearful of giving constructive feedback to top performers?

    If a leader’s job is to:

  • create a success-oriented work environment that employees can thrive in
  • help employees improve, regardless their level of performance
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    How To Stop Passive-Aggressive Behavior In The Workplace

    Passive-aggressive behavior is one of the most destructive forces you will encounter in the workplace. It can destroy the teamwork you worked so hard to create. As the manager, you should address this quickly by setting new expectations for the team.

    Rather than mandating the new expectations, get their buy-in to resolving differences among themselves in the following manner: In a team meeting say, “I’d like your input on how you prefer to resolve differences with each other. If a teammate has an issue with you or something you are doing, would you prefer:

    • they bring it to me (the manager) without discussing it with you. Then I will discuss it with you, without saying who brought it to my attention, OR
    • they come to you, and the two of you discuss the issue face to face?”

    Most people prefer to discuss it with their teammate. When your team chooses that option, you now have their buy-in. Then say to them, “Because we are all in agreement, let’s make that the new expectation. When you come to me with a problem you have with a teammate, I will ask you what you said to them before coming to me.”

    Then get their commitment to follow the 3 R’s:

  • Resolve issues with your teammates and not engage in passive-aggressive behavior
  • Refuse to listen to a teammate complaining about another – thereby eliminating the passive-aggressive person’s audience
  • Redirect the person to deliver the message to the appropriate person
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